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THERE IS NO REGISTRATION NECESSARY TO ATTEND AS A LISTENER. PLEASE NOTE THAT THERE IS A LIMITED NUMBER OF SEATS. THE SEATS ARE ASSIGNED ON A FIRST-COME-FIRST-SERVE BASIS.

FIRST VIENNA STUDENT ARCHAEOLOGY CONFERENCE

In march 2020, for the first time, a conference by and for students will take place at the institute for Classical Archaeology of the university of Vienna. In ancient times, as well in today’s scientific studies of the past, movement and exchange are the key principles of society. We expect lectures from young and coming archaeologists in an open-minded and critical environment to inspire exciting discussions and to provide thought-provoking impulses. Besides the potential to gain first hand insights into the scientific working-field, we offer participants a prime networking opportunity, an exchange of scientific experience and expertise.

info@visavis-conference.at

Key Notes

We are happy to announce Katharina Meinecke and Johannes Preiser-Kapeller as Key Notes at the VIS A VIS 2020!

Travelling Images: Late Antiquity’s Visual Culture as a Global System

Katharina Meinecke

Artefacts, and the images they are adorned with, attest to a highly connected visual culture in “long Late Antiquity”(ca. 300 to 800 C.E.). In a period characterized both by enhanced connectivity and increasing political fragmentation, the same iconographic motifs are found in geographically dispersedregions, both within the late Roman-Byzantine world and beyond. On the onehand, decorative motifs of Roman (and later Byzantine) origin appear, mingled with local elements, far beyond the traditional borders of the classical world –in the Germanic West,Himyarite South Arabia, Sasanian Iran, the Umayyad Empire,and as remote as China. On the other hand, motifsespecially of Germanic and Sasanian originare attested in Roman territories. This combination of iconographies fromdifferent traditions in various local contexts created a veritable koinéof images, which was characteristic of the Late Roman and post-Roman world.This is especially true for luxury objects and the decoration of monuments commissioned by royal or elite patrons. This paper will focus on the transfer of images between Late Antique empires and the motivation of the patrons that resulted in this highly connected visual koiné. Exemplified by case studies from different late antique empires, it will reconstructthe different steps of appropriation and translationof iconographic motifsas a cross-cultural circular system, crucial in royal and elite identity formation.

Cividale
Qusayr Amra

That’s why the object is a tramp. Approaching exchange, distribution, routes and entanglements with the help of archaeological network analysis

Johannes Preiser-Kapeller

The aim of the conference is the exploration of the “(un)known paths” of movement and exchange in the past. Over the last two decades, a growing number of archaeological studies has made use of concept and tools of network theory in order to survey modes, routes and impacts of the mobility of objects across various spatial and temporal scales.

The paper discusses some of the core elements of this approach, its underlying assumptions, methods, technologies as well as its potential and pitfalls. For this purpose, several case studies from the ancient and medieval period are presented and scrutinised, reaching from the individual object or archaeological site up to the level of an entire empire. The main aim is to provide a basis for further critical reflection of the possible use (or abuse) of network analytical tools and terminology for one´s own research and archaeological studies in general.

Visualisation of a network of the distribution of various types of ceramics among archaeological sites in the western Indian Ocean, 1st-6th cent. AD (left) and of the emerging linkages between sites (right) (J. Preiser-Kapeller, OEAW, 2016)

Hot Topic 2020

„On (un)known Paths. Movement and Exchange in Antiquity“

In antiquity, humans, object, as well as ideas and concepts are constantly traveling. From the bronze age to the late antiquity, everything seems to be on the move. Lecturers may choose topics like infrastructure, the exchange of goods, technology or religious beliefs. Migration or traveling artisans could be topics of interest, as well as the export of myths and images. The goal is to gain a better understanding of how moving antiquity was, and to obtain this lecturers are encouraged to use all the different methods and material categories found in Classical Archaeology.

The conference’s topic was deliberately formulated in an open way, to enable the lecturers to deal with all different periods from the minoan palatial age up to late antiquity. We do not want to build walls but to overcome them through exchange.

The conference will be held on two days, where your contributions will be seperated into thematically fitting groups. Furthermore there will be two final keynotes (tba). The first evening will be concluded by a casual, viennese dinner. On saturday evening, we would like to celebrate a succesful conference with a glass of wine – and possible further nightlife activities.

Contact and Submission

THERE IS NO REGISTRATION NECESSARY TO ATTEND AS A LISTENER. PLEASE NOTE THAT THERE IS A LIMITED NUMBER OF SEATS. THE SEATS ARE ASSIGNED ON A FIRST-COME-FIRST-SERVE BASIS.

Application

To apply, please send a short abstract of your chosen topic (max. 200 words), including referential literature, and state in which format you want to participate.

Deadline: 20. December 2020
info@visavis-conference.at

Should you require assistance in finding a suitable topic, do not hesitate to contact us – we gladly offer our help. Based on the received abstracts, lecturers will be chosen and thematic groups will be formed. After a review-phase every application will be answered – including those we have to reject.

Please take note that we will make all accepted abstracts publicly available on our homepage.

Additionally, we plan to provide you the opportunity to publish your contribution in a proceeding, and thus take the first steps in your scientific career.

Location

Institut für Klassische Archäologie
Franz Klein-Gasse 1
A-1190 Wien